The losing game!

I have a huge fascination for the game of Chess ever since childhood, I got introduced to the game when I visited Chennai for the first time when I was 6 years old!

I started learning the game, as I started playing it!

I still remember in the first version of the game that I learned, in which we must play only with the pawns till all of them are available, you can only step into using the other options after you exhaust them.

After a while, I learned – you cannot attack and remove the kind when others are not noticing – you have to do that, only after you provide a ‘Check’. I used to fight with my opponents, who were much older then – saying like ‘you didn’t even notice that you’re king was on check. How am I responsible for you losing’ 😛

The last learning/rule I got to know was ‘castling’ (where we interchange the rook and the king, provided there is no piece in between, and the king didn’t move before)!

Well, that’s childhood!

Very recently, I picked up an interest to play the game online (credits to chess.com) – it is fun and interesting to play all type of games including timed ones!

While I’m able to play somewhat better these days, I’ve noticed a very interesting pattern with the way I approach the game and that’s what I want to deep dive on!

King of chess game - Free Image by Akshay Gupta on PixaHive.com

Winning and losing – are two possibilities that always exists when you are playing a game with an opponent.

While your knowledge and your skills play a crucial role on the outcomes you will see (winning/losing) – there is an equal weightage and in fact more credits that goes out to your opponent too! Meaning, let us say your opponent is super strong – even if you try 100%, there are 200% chances that you will lose. Well, read that sentence again! 😀

That’s not your fault. Losing is not your fault. It is just that you didn’t get the right training/exposure/experience towards tackling the super skilled opponent!

I remember playing so much of Chess with friends/relatives during childhood – and eventually 99% of the times I fail without having knowledge/strategy/experience.

Though, I know even if I play them again (and again), there are very less opportunities for me to win; but still, I choose to challenge them again!

With Chess, I never leave an opponent after losing – I keep on playing with them until I figure out what is the strategy they are following/identifying the mistakes of my own self, trying to correct it and at least win once.

For me, then, losing is an opportunity. As I did not get any formal training/coaching kind ‘of things – losing is the only opportunity that I used to have for myself, to improve my game.

In fact, if I look back – almost all my limited mastery with the Chess game came all from this attitude – you could call it perseverance, not losing hope, determination etc.

I call it – the love for losing a game. Yes, the sheer challenge in losing a game and trying to figure out what is wrong with the next time!

If we choose to play only the games, in which we win – we are not improving ourselves/nor challenging ourselves.

The losing games, teach us a lot more about ourselves, our game. It puts us on the spot and say, “Do you want to take up this challenging task again?”. And when say a ‘Yes’, we are making the best of the losing game.

The losing game matters! More importantly, choosing a ‘rematch’ after a losing game matter even more.


April 30, 2021. Wrote this post, as I look back on completing one year of leaving my full time job and decided to pursue things on own! 🙂

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *